How to Write the Best Possible WordPress Blog Post

I’ve been blogging since 2007. It was several years later in 2011 that I started the Deja Reviewer website. You can search online and probably find a lot of my old writings on real estate, search engine optimization, inventory management, and many other subjects before I got around to analyzing movies in new and unique ways. In all that time, I’ve learned quite a few things that I’d like to share with my fellow writers.

If you have a WordPress blog, you will likely benefit quite a bit from what I’m about to share. Over the course of putting together thousands of blog posts, I’ve figured out how to get perfect SEO scores on them every single time. It’s almost a formula at this point. That doesn’t stop me from having fun in my writing. It’s just good to know the rules before you decide whether or not you want to break them.

Achieving a High AIOSEO Score

If you have the AIOSEO plugin in WordPress, you’ve probably seen a score from 0-100 for each of your blog posts. This score rates your blog posts on the following criteria. Unfortunately, it only tells you when you’re messing up. And it doesn’t really give you much guidance on what you’re aiming for or how to make improvements. Especially if you’ve already hit the arbitrary limits it sets. So I’m going to spell it all out. That way, there won’t be any confusion.

Here are the three categories you’re rated on:

Basic SEO

  • Meta description length should be 121-160 characters, including spaces.
  • Content length should be at least 300 words for the entire blog post.
  • You should have at least one internal link and one external link.

Title

  • Title length should be 41-60 characters, including spaces.

Readability

  • 120 words is the maximum number before a paragraph is considered too long.
  • No more than 25 percent of sentences should be longer than 20 words.
  • No more than 10 percent of sentences should use passive voice.
  • At least 30 percent of your sentences should have transition words.
  • You shouldn’t use the same word at the start of more than two consecutive sentences.
  • 300 words is the maximum number before a subheading section is considered too long.
  • 60.0 is the minimum acceptable Flesch reading ease score. Anything lower than that will ding you, but anything above won’t help your overall AIOSEO rating.

One more thing I’ll mention is that you may be able to add a Focus Keyphrase. That can come in handy for improving your SEO. If you do create one, it’ll add other criteria to the ones above. These include if that exact keyphrase is in your headline, introductory paragraph, meta description, URL, and subheadings. It can hurt your AIOSEO score if it’s not in those places. Except the subheadings. It’s okay if you don’t have it there.

If you want to achieve a perfect Focus Keyphrase score, though, be sure to have it in about 30-75 percent of your subheadings. Those are any text that you make H2 or H3 size.

Getting a High Flesch Reading Ease Score

Achieving a good Flesch reading ease score (60.0 and above) depends mostly on the types of words you use. I’ve found that its formula doesn’t care much about the length of your sentences or your passive voice. It mostly depends on how many words there are that are more than one syllable in length. So you really have to dumb things down if you want a good score. I’ve never managed to get higher than the 70s.

In addition, it responds to images and videos. Each one boosts your score a little. It’s a good idea to use more than one, when appropriate. Also, transition words help a lot. That score loves transition words, so I recommend you use quite a few of them. In fact, if you were to put a whole bunch of them in a row, you’d get an incredibly high score… which is what I’m about to do, actually. Normally that would be nonsensical, but in this case it serves an important purpose.

There is no written guide I have ever found to identify what words count as transition words. In WordPress, that is. I’m not one to simply give up, though, so I created my own guide. You see, I’ve learned quite a few of them through trial and error.

Quirks of Transition Words

Below is my current list of all the words and phrases that will help both your transition word percentage and your Flesch reading ease score. When I originally wrote this, I said that I wasn’t totally sure if they have to be right at the start or end of sentences to count. I knew that they worked perfectly well at the start of a sentence. However, I learned something new just now!

My signoff is pretty much always the same at the end of each article: “This is the Deja Reviewer bidding you farewell until we meet again.” When I accidentally removed that line, I noticed that my transition word percentage went down. As it turns out, “until” counts as a transition word, although it’s near the end of the sentence. So I figured out that transition words do count even in the middle of a sentence.

You can use the same transition word more than once and have it be counted separately from the previous instance(s). But I’m not sure how many times you can get away with that in a single blog post. At least three times, it seems. And that might change based on the total word count of the article.

This is a huge work in progress. For instance, while putting my list together, I came up with more than a half-dozen new transition words I had never thought of before: a while ago, chiefly, even more, in order to, in summary, owing to, and previously. So I’m sure I’ll come up with many others after publishing this article.

List of Transition Words

I’ve categorized and alphabetized all of these transition words as best as I can. Some could fit into multiple categories, like “that is.” Plus, just about any adverb followed by “so” works as a transition word. I’ve included some examples in the “Affirmative” section below.

This list includes more than 120 transition words/phrases:

Affirmative

Alarmingly so

Astonishingly so

Certainly

Definitely so

Perfectly so

Pleasantly so

Probably so

Quite so

Surely

Unfortunately so

Also

Additionally

Also

Another

Even more

Further

Furthermore

In addition

In another

Before and After

A while ago

A while back

After that

As before

Before

Earlier

Never before

Previously

Shortly after

Conclusion

At last

Eventually

Finally

Last

Last of all

Last time

Lastly

During

During

In the meantime

Meanwhile

While

Emphasizing

Above all

As a matter of fact

At least

Chiefly

Especially

In fact

In truth

Indeed

Just so

Not surprisingly

Of course

Surprisingly

That

Without a doubt

Example

For example

For instance

Following

Similarly

Such as

The following

These following

However

Although

Be that as it may

Besides

But

Despite

Even though

However

In spite of

Instead

Mistaken though

On the other hand

Otherwise

Rather

Regardless

Still

Surely not

That is

Though

Unless

Unlike

If

Even if

If

If so

Only if

Whether

In Case

In case

In that case

In this case

Just in case

Summary

Altogether

Basically

In essence

In other words

In summary

Then

Accordingly

And then

As a result

As long as

Because

Hence

Henceforth

In order to

Only then

Owing to

Since

Since then

So

Then

Thereafter

Therefore

Thus

To that end

To this end

Time

At this point

In the long run

In the short run

Now that

Once

Remember when

Soon

Until

Up until

Very soon

When

Whenever

With

Together with

With this in mind

Crafting the Ideal Headline

Headline scores are similar to AIOSEO scores in that they have a rating from 0-100. But their criteria are much different. To receive the highest rating, you need to meet the following criteria:

  • 20 percent or more Common Words
  • 10 percent or more Uncommon Words
  • 10 percent or more Emotional Words
  • At least one Power Word

I’ve never been able to get a headline score higher than 93. That seems to be the upper limit, even though it says it goes to 100. Anything over 70 is considered great, but I always aim for somewhere from 85-93.

If possible, I recommend keeping the word count to 10. Because when you do that, you only need to have two Common Words and one of each of the others. You can go higher than the minimum, no problem. But you don’t want to dip below the minimum. Not every headline has to have every type of word. But it’s helpful to know what your options are so you can include each type, if you want.

Sometimes the same word falls into multiple categories, like new, now, better, and best. Using those words helps you be more concise while still hitting the target. Try to stay at 60 characters or under, including spaces.

List of Headline Words

I bolded the words (other than Common Words) that fall under more than one category. On with the list:

Common Words

A

About

After

All

An

And

Are

As

At

Be

But

By

Can

Did

Do

Ever

For

From

Get

Has

Have

He

Her

His

How

If

In

Is

It

Just

Like

Me

Most

My

No

Not

Of

On

She

So

That

The

Their

There

These

They

Things

This

To

Up

Was

What

When

Who

Why

Will

With

You

Your

Uncommon Words

Actually

Awesome

Baby

Beautiful

Being

Best

Better

Boy

Dog

Down

Facebook

First

Found

Girl

Good

Guy

Happened

Heart

Here

It’s

Its

Know

Life

Little

Look

Love

Made

Make

Makes

Man

Media

Mind

More

Need

Never

New

Now

Old

One

Out

People

Photos

Really

Reasons

Right

See

Seen

Social

Something

Thing

Think

Time

Valentines

Video

Want

Watch

Way

Ways

World

Year

Years

You’ll

Emotional Words

Destroy

Devastating

Devoted

Dirty

Disastrous

Dollar

Double

Dumb

Empower

Energize

Epic

Evil

Explode

Exposed

Extra

Fail

Faith

Famous

Fantastic

Feast

Fire

Fool

Forbidden

Forgotten

For the first time

Frightening

Fulfill

Gambling

Gift

Grateful

Hack

Happy

Hate

Helpless

Hidden

High

Hoax

Hope

Horrific

How to make

Illegal

In a

In the

In the world

Inexpensive

Insanely

Invasion

Is the

Is what happens when

It looks like a

Jail

Jeopardy

Killer

Lies

Line

Lonely

Looks like a

Looming

Lost

Lying

Make you

Massive

Meltdown

Minute

Mistakes

Money

Murder

Myths

Nightmare

Of the

Offer

Official

On the

Overcome

Painful

Pale

Panic

Payback

Peril

Played

Plummet

Poor

Pound

Prison

Private

Prize

Profit

Protected

Quadruple

Refund

Research

Results

Revenge

Rich

Risky

Ruthless

Scary

Scream

Secure

Seize

Shatter

Silly

Skyrocket

Smash

Soaring

Spectacular

Spine

Spirit

Staggering

Strangle

Stupid

Sure

Surge

Surprising

Surprisingly

Surrender

Swindle

Tank

Targeted

Tempting

Terror

That will

That will make

The best

The most

This is

This is the

This is what

This is what happens

Thrilling

Tired

To be

To the

Trap

Treasure

Triple

Triumph

Truth

Turn the tables

Unauthorized

Under

Underhanded

Unexpected

Unscrupulous

Victim

Victory

Vindication

Viral

Volatile

Vulnerable

Warning

What happened

What happens

What happens when

What this

When you

Worry

Wounded

You need to

You need to know

You see

You see what

Power Words

Advice

Affordable

Amazing

Announcing

Approved

Astonishing

Attractive

Authentic

Beautiful

Better

Big

Bottom line

Challenge

Compare

Competitive

Complete

Compromise

Delighted

Delivered

Destiny

Direct

Discount

Download

Easily

Easy

Edge

Emerging

Energy

Enormous

Excellent

Exciting

Exclusive

Expert

Exploit

Focus

Fortune

Free

Full

Great

Greatest

Growth

Helpful

Highest

How to

Hurry

Imagination

Immediately

Important

Improved

Innovative

Insider

Interesting

Introducing

Just arrived

Largest

Last minute

Latest

Launching

Limited

Love

Luxury

Magic

Mainstream

Monumental

New

Noted

Now

Odd

Opportunities

Perspective

Popular

Portfolio

Powerful

Practical

Professional

Profitable

Promising

Proven

Quality

Quick

Quickly

Rare

Reduced

Reliable

Remarkable

Revealing

Revolutionary

Reward

Sale

Sampler

Scarce

Secrets

Security

Sensational

Shrewd

Simple

Skill

Special

Spotlight

Startling

Strange

Strong

Successful

Suddenly

Superior

Surging

Surprise

Survival

Technology

Tested

The truth about

Timely

Ultimate

Unusual

Unique

Urgent

Useful

Valuable

Value

Wanted

Wealth

Weird

Wonderful

Creating the Perfect Blog Post

Now you know exactly how to craft a perfect blog post that will receive a 100/100 AIOSEO score, a 60.0+ Flesch score, and a 93/100 headline rating. What are you going to do with this knowledge? Once you see these patterns, you can keep pumping out flawless blog posts. Feel free to take note of which words you’d like to put in your headlines. And use a variety of transition words to keep your sentences flowing nicely.

This article won’t get a perfect AIOSEO score because I used the same word three or more times in a row in multiple instances. But it couldn’t be helped. The headline I crafted is as good as it gets. Because it uses both Common and Power Words in “How to,” and it has a Common, Uncommon, and Emotional Word in “the Best.” Also, it is nine words and 50 characters long. Perfectly within parameters.

Not only that, but I used plenty of transition words in the article itself. Maybe the 400 headline words will wipe away the advantage of listing 125 transition words earlier. However, I hope I’m safely covered. In any case, the point of this article isn’t achieving a perfect AIOSEO score. It’s to give you all the tools you need to become a master blogger yourself.

This is the summation of a decade and a half of my professional life. At least in the blogging sphere. And it has been a labor of love.

If you do take advantage of what I’ve shared above, please let me know your results at some point in the future. I’d love to hear if it helped you become a better writer, find more success online, and improve your SEO.

This is the Deja Reviewer bidding you farewell until we meet again.

About Robert Lockard, the Deja Reviewer

Robert Lockard has been a lover of writing since he was very young. He studied public relations in college, graduating with a Bachelor’s degree in 2006. His skills and knowledge have helped him to become a sought-after copywriter in the business world. He has written blogs, articles, and Web content on subjects such as real estate, online marketing and inventory management. His talent for making even boring topics interesting to read about has come in handy. But what he really loves to write about is movies. His favorite movies include: Fiddler on the Roof, Superman: The Movie, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan, Back to the Future, Beauty and the Beast, The Fugitive, The Incredibles, and The Dark Knight. Check out his website: Deja Reviewer. Robert lives in Utah with his wife and four children. He loves running, biking, reading, and watching movies with his family.
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